thefrogman

catsbeaversandducks:

Meet Bertie, the owl who is afraid of going outside… and he loves nothing more than helping his owner make a cup of tea!

Bertie, the three-year-old tawny owl that is agoraphobic. He shares a farmhouse with his owner Peter Middleton, and after his daily bath he likes to dry his feathers by sitting on top of the aga. When he isn’t welcoming guests with a hoot or preening them on the sofa, he’s hard at work letter shredding in the office. Mr Middleton said the domesticated owl, which he adopted after he was left abandoned on the ground, hates the outdoors. He said: “He just doesn’t like going outside, I think he’s agoraphobic. He’s not used it and he’s very comfortable in the house.”

Via Daily Mail

Can you train it where to poop? Cleaning up random bird shit around the house would have to suck.

vmagazine

vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer

Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / / 3

As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]

©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved

There’s a documentary about Jameel Shabazz. Totally worth watching for his approach. It gets deep without getting too deep.